Pick a little, talk a little, pick a little, talk a little chat chat chat, talk a lot, pick a little more

I have a very VERY bad habit of interrupting — know it, aware of it, trying hard to stop it.   Bad habits ARE hard to break.
I also can ramble……get distracted……and then need a nudge to get me back on track.

So — as you know — habits are like when you buy a new make of car.   When you buy one, you start to notice all the other people who have one too.   (grins)

Segue into today’s thoughts:

Weekly chats are popping up all over the place.
#edchat
#spedchat
#elemchat
(Here is a listing collected by Cybraryman:  http://cybraryman.com/chats.html#MONDAYS)

just to name a few.

Each week — same bat time, same back channel.  In this case, the channel is twitter.

And though I enjoy a good conversation — both listening and participating — there are some things about these chats that just nudge me a bit to speak out and share my thoughts and offer some suggestions.

I wonder if Twitter really is the best venue for these chats.  True, I guess if you are using tweet deck and you follow JUST the hashtag, perhaps they are more manageable.  But from what I have seen so far, people are twittering over twitters and often good conversations are being missed and there is a lot of off-track talk, lots of venting, and also a great deal of overlapping of same thoughts but they seem to not see each other.
I don’t know what venue would be better — but wonder IF there might be a better area.

I would suggest that perhaps 2 or 3 people step back and stop sharing and perhaps start moderating.  One person could RT out thoughts that really need to be noticed or point out how same people are sharing same ideas.  One person could post out a WE ARE WANDERING twitter to help get things back on track.

But my main concern with these chats is the fact that it seems like MANY MANY are talking but few are listening.  And MANY MANY are ranting without giving ideas of how to perhaps stop what they are ranting about.

And there is NOT enough push back.   And there needs to be.  And this could be the job of the 3rd moderator.   Stop and ask WHY.    Don’t let someone throw out a statement that needs to be challenged and let it just go unnoticed.

I’m not saying that I don’t like a good chat — because I do, very much so.

But when everyone is talking at the same time…….usually it turns out that no one is being heard.

Just my thoughts.
Jen

4 comments

  1. Dan Callahan says:

    I completely agree, and this is one of the reasons why I generally don’t participate in any of these chats, other than to reply to the occasional thing somebody says which I notice. I would honestly say that a chat room (remember those?) is a better medium for this kind of activity than Twitter, because it’s based around extended conversations, while Twitter is really not inteended for that.

    I completely understand why they’re on Twitter…that’s where the people are, after all. But for those of us who don’t participate, it typically just adds to the noise present on Twitter.

  2. Nancy says:

    It’s an issue that could be solved by a Mornimg Meeting rule generated by my 2nd graders — listen to others. 🙂 I find that even with apps aka HootSuite the flow is sometimes too fast to follow & it is definitely too fast to process.

  3. geek.teacher says:

    […] Pick a little, talk a little, pick a little, talk a little chat chat chat, talk a lot, pick a little… […]

  4. I agree, to a certain extent. I get a lot of good ideas and expand my world view through many of these chats. However, I tend to sit back, as you suggest, and read until I find something that I seize on and start up “side” conversations with a few people. What I like about these chats is that these side conversations always end up being with different people, with different backgrounds and experiences, and always seem to teach me something new. But like you say, without these smaller conversations, these chats can sometimes just be a lot of noise. Thanks for this post!

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